Total Pageviews

Friday, 3 June 2016

IPP.There are so many problems with the sentence despair is not getting through to the government because of so many barriers .




 

03/06/2016

Families are lobbying  the injustice of the IPP  sentence and informed that  they need a majority of a 100.000 before you can be heard in parliament to stand a chance of tabling questions to the house.This will be challenging  since  there are   4000 families .  The  UK  is not totally  aware of the sentence or its existence.

I question why the  FAMILYS have to  lobby since the  ipp sentence is an on going injustice the government are aware of little of the continuing problems surely they would want to know   but the  families are BATTLEING  to demonstrate  the suffering and despair  by having to continually lobby there MPs. 

What I found to more disgusting is    HUNDREDS of MPs ignoring letters of pleas from the family's and don't reply and a lot of the  Ministry of justice correspondence is repetitive with know transparency .

There has been  accounts of  Lords correspondence stating get a solicitor? The IPP is a specialist area and needs a barrister and but have they overlooked the government took away legal aid?

There are so many problems with the sentence it is causing  despair as the ples are not getting through  because of  the obstacles put in place and as a resulted had lead to a record of deaths and attempted suicides because there unable to cope with this everlasting sentence and no end date .

The author, Bob Knowles, August 2011 has served 9 years on the IMB at HMP Wandsworth. He wrote in a  in a personal capacity back then  The rise, impact and hoped-for death of IPPs
IndependentI was only vaguely aware of IPPs when they emerged from the Criminal Justice Act (CJA) 2003 and were first implemented in 2005. It was reading the expressions of despair and anger they provoked in contributors to a blog that opened my eyes to what this law with its taunting hints of freedom can do to people’s minds. The writers were nearly all family members and friends of IPP prisoners, struggling in the limbo of not knowing when if ever their loved ones would be released. They wrote stark accounts of personal despair and familial breakdown which filled countless pages of this blog from 2007 onwards and made me think that, as a member of the Independent Monitoring Board (IMB) in a large local prison with its own proportionate number of IPP prisoners, I could perhaps offer occasional support to these people, many of whom were clearly at their wits’ end.
Lord Hurd of Westwell refers to ‘… the havoc caused by a pre-occupation with risk and the resulting ill-thought- through legislation. Independent Monitoring Board, from insidetime issue August 2011


31 May 2016
Sickening injustice Kafkaesque conditions for the release of IPP prisoners | Letters 
Kafka could indeed have been invented for an indeterminate penalty of civil protection (IPP), but it is even more unjust as the article described in ( Defunct law that holds thousands of prison is branded absurd Clarke 
Not only the men, women and children to spend a few years back the tariff set by the judge, but when they are released in the license to live. Last year, 363 people were returned to prison after suffering years in prison, only to serve through the years throughout the parole process again.
Last week, I met with the prisoner’s family had been given the tariff for one year. After 13 years, he is still in prison. When he is released, probably a couple of years, he will be the life of the license and subjected to recall at any time. Only after another 10 years, he can apply to have the license removed. So far, no one has done this, so we do not know whether it will ever be granted.
We are mass incarceration in this country, not just the scale of the US, but not so very far away. We need to learn from the Americans, who deals with mass incarceration by reducing the excessively long prison sentences. IPP has been deleted, but is still with us – and will be for decades if we do not just get people released, but to deal with the validity of the license envisaged by legislation of Franz Kafka.
Frances Crook
CEO, Howard Federal Penal Reform
Guardian, the BBC, the reform of the prison Trust and Ken Clarke are performed an invaluable service re-exposing the injustice and inhumanity ever visited thousands of prisoners in England and Wales who have served the “punishment” period of time punishment, but still so far punished for crimes they can not prove they did not commit in the future if released – a kind of punitive, indefinite remand certainly unprecedented in a democracy for peace during. Ken Clarke, the Justice secretary to be removed for an indeterminate sentences of public protection (IPP) in 2012. The figures are the Ministry of Justice website either hopelessly out of date or do not distinguish between the IPP and the (very different) for life, or both, but the BBC says there are still about 4000 little hope of ever released, and that nearly 400 have served more than five times the time penalty of their sentences. proposed a simple solution to Ken Clarke before he was spinelessly sacked David Cameron is to abandon the Kafkaesque condition for release that the IPP prisoner must meet the Parole Board that he will not reoffend (naturally impossible task), and to replace the parole board an obligation to provide for release at the end of period penalty, unless it is specific, published reasons to believe that the prisoner poses a serious threat to the public if released.
If enough MPs to receive messages from constituents call on Parliament to make this simple and undeniable change immediately, there’s outside chance that disgusting injustice finally stopped. (Labour apparent silence of the matter is incomprehensible.)
Brian Bardera
London 

 
Ken Clarke abolished imprisonment for public protection (IPP) sentences in the UK in 2012. ‘We have mass incarceration in this country, not quite on the US scale, but not so very far off,’ writes Frances Crook. Photograph: Felix Clay for the Guardian
Kafka could indeed have invented the indeterminate sentence for public protection (IPP), but it is even more iniquitous than described in your article (Defunct law that keeps thousands in jail is branded absurd by Clarke, 31 May).
Not only are men, women and children spending years past the tariff imposed by the judge, but once released they are on licence for life. Last year 363 people were returned to prison after having served years in jail, only to serve more years to go through the whole parole process yet again.
Last week I met the family of a prisoner who had been given a tariff of one year. After 13 years, he is still in prison. When he is released, probably in another couple of years, he will be on life licence and subject to recall at any time. Only after another 10 years could he apply to have the licence lifted. As yet no one has done this, so we don’t know if it will ever be granted.
We have mass incarceration in this country, not quite on the US scale, but not so very far off. We have to learn from the Americans, who are addressing mass incarceration by cutting back on excessively long prison sentences. The IPP has been abolished, but is still with us – and will be for decades unless we not only get people released from prison but deal with the licence period imposed by legislation designed by Franz Kafka.

Frances Crook
Chief executive, The Howard League for Penal Reform
The Guardian, the BBC, the Prison Reform Trust and Ken Clarke have performed an invaluable service in again exposing the injustice and inhumanity still being visited on the thousands of prisoners in England and Wales who have served the “punishment” period of their sentences, but are still being indefinitely punished for crimes they can’t prove they won’t commit in the future if released – a form of punitive, indefinite preventive detention surely unprecedented in a democracy in peacetime. Ken Clarke as justice secretary abolished indeterminate sentences for public protection (IPPs) in 2012. Figures on the Ministry of Justice website are either hopelessly out of date, or fail to distinguish between IPPs and (quite different) life sentences, or both, but the BBC says there are still about 4,000 with little hope of ever being released, and that nearly 400 have served more than five times the period for punishment in their sentences. The simple solution proposed by Ken Clarke before he was spinelessly sacked by David Cameron is to abandon the Kafkaesque condition for release that the IPP prisoner must satisfy the parole board that he or she will not reoffend (an inherently impossible requirement), and substitute a parole board obligation to order release at the end of the punishment period unless it has specific, published reasons for believing that the prisoner will constitute a serious threat to the public if released.
If enough MPs receive messages from constituents calling on parliament to make this simple and uncontroversial change forthwith, there’s an outside chance that a sickening injustice will at long last be ended. (Labour’s apparent silence on the issue is incomprehensible.)
Brian Barder
London




  


No comments:

Post a Comment