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Friday, 20 October 2017

I attended the Investigation  into the Parole  board on the 18th October 2017 .The Justice Committee
was examining the effectiveness of the parole system and the circumstances of people serving indeterminate sentences of imprisonment for public protection (IPP prisoners) see parliament TV link at bottom of page.




Ellie Reeves- Labour on justice ,Victoria Prentis- Conservative on justice committee, Laura Pidock David Hanson and John Howell being a snapshot.


 Sam Gyimah Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Justice.



I asked both Nick and Martin what they thought would put an end to the IPP finally? Both said a policy change in the bill.

Left Martin Jones , Nick Hardwick and Katherine Gleeson


Following up the National Audit Office’s February 2017 report Investigation into the Parole Board, the Committee will be asking about measures taken by the Parole Board and the Ministry of Justice to improve the effectiveness of the Board and the parole system which it administers.The Committee will also be asking about the particular circumstances of people serving indeterminate sentences of imprisonment for public protection (IPP prisoners) who have served more than their tariff, and about steps which the Parole Board and the Ministry have taken, and could take in the future, to address their situation. wirnesses
Professor Nick Hardwick, Chair, and Martin Jones, Chief Executive, Parole Board of England and WalesSam Gyimah MP, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Prisons and Probation, Ministry of Justice.

Notations taken on the day  

First i have to say it was frustrating I felt  the panel did not ask the all right questions do  I would urge family and the public to write to the committee  and ask them to  consider further  question you want the committee to ask the parole board so that   decisions in there investigation are balanced. Ive  hear the Committee  don’t examine personal cases but will consider question that can be put to the enquiry.  

The panel asked Nick Hardwick when you have problems do you share them with Minsters?  Nick Hardwick often. I had spoken to David Langton, Sam Gyimah the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Justice.
The panel called in witness Sam Gyimah and in conversation  said he had good relations with Nick Hardwick and Martin Jones. The panel asked have you ever spoken to nick Hardwick on the problems? no he said.    Panel asked Sam Gyimah how much you gave to parole board? He said depends on what they need, we gave to million to train new members. 16-8 million we have responded to parole board’s needs.  Parole board said a further millions of public money went on compensation for delays. The panel said this was too high how do we get this downThe parole board said get faster hearings and working speedily with other agencies.
Parole also mention that the prisons can’t get reports together but they have an action plan in place.
Panel said is there a time scale? um, referee to  minutes of meeting.  Sam Gyima was asked for figures which he did not have. Sam Gyimah did not seem to be with it he must of know what the panel would ask for figures yet he did not have them?
 The panel  him would you agree a bill will sort out all the  problem with the IPP? Sam Gyimah reply's this would be complicated and take too long but could be considered.

Parole board Figures 3.300 IPP prisoners. Released this year 500 hope for another 500 by the end of this year. Recall 500 cases waiting for a hearing. The said to parole board 520 cases last year 204 cases this year you’re a fault for some of this can you do better?
Parole board we have been at fault for some of this and we need to improve.
The panel asked the parole if you were fully efficient system what the rate would be Marin jones reply’s 20% Hardwick disagreed because the report want be significant enough half the cases referred because of cases not written up by offender mangers. 
The panel said that not good enough situation how you going about tackling that problem? Parole board said making sure when asked for a report it is going to add value to their case. To know about the delay in time. Not waiting for third party to come up with the goods. We are working with 6 prisons at the moment how to get sufficiency in the system.  key reasons for delays:, resources, staff member no longer in posts, not enough psychologist, technology ,staff not doing there work, access to programs , critical of ROTAL

Probation said they will try to get it the figures down 1,500 by 2020 but this depends on the facilities? The panel said why did you take too long to recruit staff members? Parole board said we have a recruitment drive 2016 he mention some members where not doing as much as they should. They were going to have a better monitoring of members moving to a system of monitory. We will also look the impact of mental health on staff. 

The panel said delays and litigations how you see that per portion. Damages they have sorn up millions of pounds this year in compensation a proportion of the expenditure. One panel member cut In surely you can simplify compensation so that prisoners don’t need solicitors, why not make the area more transparent.
·         Mentioned, prisoner were  50% 5- 8years or more over tariff
·         That a IPP progression unit has been set up to progress.

·        Mentioned, shortish of psychologist the area is not working. 
 panel asked Sam Gyima for figures who couldn't give them and said he would forward the figures at a lather date.
·         Mentioned was the complexes of needs.
·        Mentioned was the differcuties with the licence conditions and that probation should look at the thresh hold of recall as we don’t want a revolving door.
·         50% recall
·         Released 42 0n paper progress figures is said to be 75%
·       Said was too much reliance was put on agency’s probation had to form a new relationship with other agency.
Personally the goal post of dates seem to be changing that’s a red flag!

See Investigation  into the Parole on Parliament Tv

https://goo.gl/WAcWYV  Im i  seated next to  Nick Hardwick in green. http://parliamentlive.tv/Event/Index/d68b1225-3ebe-48cf-aaeb-1c6ba2f0b1e3

Comments
Ford Seemed to me Hardwicke doing his best to say probation is benighted, but politely because he has to work with them, some committee members asking incisive questions then allowing themselves to be fobbed of by that crass prisons .minister on IPP: "It's the law", but a bad law doesn't stop being a bad law because nobody prepared to do anything about it - not only is this callous man content to leave men in prison for 10 years+ followed by 10 years on licence, by which time their life is blighted, but seems to think the outrageous number of recalls is acceptable, the MoJ itself putting as a reason failure to remain in contact, so not seeing your 'offender manager' looks the equivalent of a criminal offence so back to jail you go, as if there wasn't enough cause for despair already. No wonder 50% of IPPs mutilate or kill themselves. Probation have too much power, ministers couldn't care less so this was a useless talking shop that will change nothing for those holding on to sanity while important people talk about 'risk 'which can't be measured, courses which even MoJ says are discredited and a prison system bursting at the seams because it's easier to live with Ken Clarke's "stain on the justice system" than have the inconvenience of doing anything about it - no wonder politicians are held in such contempt
 Milton spot on Mike I thought Nick Hardwick and Martin Jones were totally plausible totally focused on what their aims were and how they were going to achieve them and like you I also felt they were laying the problem with the recalls firmly at probation services door.
Sam gyimah keep repeating "lawful sentence" was ridiculous we all know it was a lawful sentence when it was given but it's not a lawful sentence now so the question is "what are you going to do about it now " because it's not going away any time soon and he didn't have any acceptable answer typical politician who doesn't realise these are not just facts and figures these are real people with real lives .
 Ford I think he would argue it's lawful because tho. abolished 2012, not retrospectively, so still lawful for those locked up before that, which produces the despicable situation that if one committed a similar offence now the punishment might be 18 months . I think he would argue it's lawful because tho. abolished 2012, not retrospectively, so still lawful for those locked up before that, which produces the despicable situation that if one committed a similar offence now the punishment might be 18 months and that's it, but same thing in 2008 for example, you have an indeterminate sentence and the possibility of seeing people in for the same kind of offence come and go while you stay inside for years and years in a concrete box for up to 23 hours a day -, this is a circle they don't want to square because it doesn't affect them and I imagine are too lazy to be bothered, yet are supposed to be representing 'Justice'. Hypocrites
Milton how it's acceptable to abolish a sentence that breeches human rights and not do anything respectively is beyond me.
if you create a problem such as IPP you should have a duty to clear up the legacy left behind not just ignore it and hope it will quietly go away on its own because it won't and real people's lives are being wasted and sadly lost because of it.



Dame Stacey response to a Family of an IPP prisoner. The letter lacked transparency and did not answer the question.




21 Septermber  2017 Letter from an IPP family to Dame Stacey inspecter of probation.




PRISON SAFETY AND REFORM 2017
http://www.parliament.uk/documents/commons-committees/treasury/Correspondence/Letter-dated-28-Feb-2017-from-Sam-Gyimah-on-Prison-safety-and-reform.pdf
https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/safety-in-custody-statistics.

 Justice Committee examines work of the Parole Board http://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/justice-committee/news-parliament-2017/evidence-session-work-of-the-parole-board/

IPP prisoner may “require” that his case should be referred to the Parole Board, ... to levels consistent with release into the community ...https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/ld200809/ldjudgmt/jd090506/james-5.htm

serving public protection sentences http://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-questions-answers/?page=1&max=20&questiontype=AllQuestions&house=commons%2clords&member=4425&dept=54

Tuesday, 17 October 2017

IPP, Incarcerated Workers Organising Committee

                   

October 17, 2017   

             


15 years ago Hassan Khan (Prisoner Number: A1187AK) was convicted of robbery and got a IPP “two strikes” sentence – a mandatory life sentence for people convicted of a second  offense. This sentence carried a 4 year 166 days minimum tariff but he has been inside for 15 years.
He grew up in care in Birmingham and has a Pashtun Father and a Welsh Mother. He had a very troubled childhood with his problems with the law starting at 8 years old. He sued West Midlands Police, having been framed by them and was awarded £23,000 damages. Not long after winning this case he was set up a second time by a corrupt police officer who planted evidence on a crime scene setting him up for a robbery he didn’t commit.

A close relative of Hassan’s stated that:
The system has never forgiven Hassan for exposing, through a landmark case, a corrupt West Midlands Serious Crime Squad as liars, falsifying statements and tampering with vital evidence. This eventually led to many innocent people, like the Birmingham 6 for example to be released. The ‘brotherhood’ within the judicial, legal and police system has never forgiven him for that.”



Image result for hassan khan miscarriage of justice
Hassan with two of his sons

Hassan has spent 15 years behind bars this November. He faces an impossible situation – his security file in his parole dossier, that will be used to make the decision to release him or not, is full of racist lies alleging he is connected to Muslim gangs, Isis, and dealing drugs and phones. These lies are complete nonsense and the prison won’t even tell Hassan where this “intelligence” came from. Hassan has no way of challenging their racialised accusations against him.
He has 4 grown up sons in north Wales and desperately wants to be part of their lives. His mental health has deteriorated to the point he wants to give up hope but he has kept his resolve and has undertaken several lengthy hunger strikes to protest about his situation. Hassan needs to be released immediately to a hostel or his friend’s house in North Wales so that this 63 year old man can try and salvage his relationship with the children he has missed growing up due to the corruption of the racist West Midlands Police. This is our campaign goal and we are asking people to contact HMP Gartree where he is imprisoned.

These are the Guardian articles outlining the way he was set up – twice.
https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2009/jun/01/hassan-khan-miscarriage-police-set-up
https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2010/nov/04/sunglasses-armed-robbery-missing

Why Hassan needs us to take action:
Hassan has a parole hearing coming up on the 19th of October. Despite him doing his best to comply with the prison system his security file that the parole board will read is full of racialised lies about him because of his ethnic background and because he is a practicing Muslim.  He cannot progress through his sentence when coming up against the lies like this – especially in the current political climate. Hassan belongs with his family in north Wales. He wants to go and live with his friend who is in poor health and support him.

Life in prison is taking its toll on Hassan – he has written an autobiography called “A Wasted life.” which the IWW’s Incarcerated Workers Organising Committee are hoping to publish as a booklet.
Hassan needs us to act NOW! His parole is imminent (on the 19th of October) and this will be the only chance to set him free in the next 2 years. He has been considering that if he does not get parole he will undertake a hunger strike until death.

What you can do:
You can only write by letter – and all letters need to be received by the 17th of October, please post your letters to arrive by this date.

Write to the Governor of HMP Gartree voicing your concerns about his situation and that he should be released. You can find a template below but we recommend you put this into your own words if possible as it will have much more of an impact. Please let the Incarcerated Workers Organising Committee know if you’ve written to them so we know people are responding and fighting for Hassan.

Address: HMP Gartree
Gallow Field Road,
Market Harborough,
Leicestershire,
LE16 7RP

Dear Govenor Ali Barker
I am writing to express my deep concern about prisoner Hassan Khan who is currently in HMP Gartree. He is a “2 strikes” prisoner over a decade over tariff, with a parole hearing coming up on the 19th of October.

It has emerged that his security file is littered with Islamophobic and racist lies. It is a travesty that someone like Mr Khan who is in prison with his case now at appeal centering on allegations of police corruption, and that now, after 15 years in prison – over 10 years over his original tariff is being obstructed in the progression of his sentence by these baseless accusations. This is having serious consequences for Hassan’s friends, family and Mr Khan himself. These false statements are likely to be obstructing Hassan’s progression in his sentence.

He is serving an indeterminate sentence and denying him a fair hearing is literally putting his life in danger, him having peacefully protested in the past with several hunger strikes at the injustice of his situation, not to mention this having a knock on effect on his progression.

I ask with urgency for you to investigate why Hassan’s security file is full of these utter lies and for the officer(s) alleging these things against him to be investigated for a form of institutional racial abuse.

Hassan has several friends and members of his family supportive of him coming home. I look forward to your written response confirming that you will take action to put Mr Khan on the right path to a life outside of prison.
Yours sincerely,

PETITION
https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/free-the-remaining-ipp-prisoners?source=facebook-share-button&time=1457618246



http://incarceratedworkers.noflag.org.uk/2017/10/12/action-alert-freedom-for-hassan-khan/

Leroy Skeete Ex-Offender & Legal Aid Campaigner speaks out on the current state of the criminal justice system

     
From:Leroy Skeete
To:katherinegleeson <katherinegleeson@aol.com>
Date:
Tue, 17 Oct 2017 19:55



Dear Katherine,

My view on the current state regarding criminal justice and in particular, IPP Sentences is as follows:

The downward spiral started with Michael Howard and the section two life sentence. A blatant attempt to win votes.

The knock-on effect of this has made society a far more dangerous place. Witnesses to crimes are in far more danger than ever before, because the perpetrator now facing an unjustifiable life sentence, is more likely to be willing to dispose of a witness.

As for the equally draconian IPP sentence. We live in a society that has no capital punishment, but Tory policies have seen a rising number of deaths in British prisons. So, we have a situation were one half of the population of IPP prisoners are in such despair they are contemplating suicide. And the other half have nothing to loose, which make them highly dangerous. The results of which are being seen daily in the media coverage of disturbances throughout the prison system

None of these laws passed were ever about making society a better place. It has always been about votes and power.

Long since have the ruling classes used Race and Crime to pit the poor against each, whilst they have their snouts in the trough.

Shame on this government! They should never ever be allowed to have their hands on our criminal justice system ever again.

My Interview  


Leroy Skeete
Ex-Offender & Legal Aid Campaigner




Reply's to katherinegleeson@aol.com 






The Partner of Ian Hartly wanted the letter to be made public regards the very harrowing effect of this IPP law.










Letter to his Family.














 Copied to MP,s and First Ministers! Please share with your MP, other....



It is not enough for  the government to keep saying  their concerned now 10 years on.  The government must  lead from the front and end the toll of despair.

Ken Clarke said in Belfast Telegraph said Prisoners serving 'discredited' IPP sentences are 'self-harming in despair' but a year on from the article we are no further. IPP death toll figures are high,the families are concerned as numbers are receiving letters from love ones Scarcely holding on. 
http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/uk/prisoners-serving-discredited-ipp-sentences-selfharming-in-despair-34826596.html

PETITIONhttps://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/free-the-remaining-ipp-prisoners?source=facebook-share-button&time=1457618246


Reply's to katherinegleeson@aol.com 














Public Event Reminder for IPP,s and Family,s tomorrow 12 october 10.00am Bridge Street ,London SW1A 2LW

The Week in Justice 2017

Two big stories dominated the criminal justice news this week.
Firstly, the parole board's decision to release IPP prisoner James Ward after serving 11 years of a 10 month sentence increased the pressure for expediting the release of the 3,000 IPP prisoners still in prison. 
Also of interest was the launch of a new report from the Conservative Think Tank, the Centre for Social Justice, with a 10-point plan for re-booting the Rehabilitation Revolution.




12 October 2017
The Justice Committee will hold an evidence session on The work of the Parole Board on Wednesday 18 October 2017 at 10.00am in the Thatcher Room, Portcullis House.

The Committee will also be asking about the particular circumstances of people serving indeterminate sentences of imprisonment for public protection (IPP prisoners) who have served more than their tariff, and about steps which the Parole Board and the Ministry have taken, and could take in the future, to address their situation.

Witnesses

Wednesday 18 October 2017
At 10.00am: Professor Nick Hardwick, Chair, and Martin Jones, Chief Executive, Parole Board of England and Wales
At 10.45am (approx.): Sam Gyimah MP, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Prisons and Probation, Ministry of Justice.

Attend the meeting

Members of the public are welcome to attend the meeting.
There is no system of tickets or advance booking for seats in the public section of the committee room, but there is normally no problem in seating all members of the public who wish to attend.
Please advise security staff that you are attending a committee meeting and they will direct you.
You should allow at least 20 minutes to go through security.

Directions

Get off the train at Westminster exit go"left out of station couple of paces turn left  before the bridge is Portcullis House , don't cross over bridge or you've gone to fare. Directions: https://binged.it/2gMoImV


 

http://thejusticegap.com/2017/09/sealing-criminal-records-best-way-help-ex-offenders-turn-lives-around/
Russell Webster <solutions@russellwebster.com

Comments




Peters
Hi Katherine,
I thought I heard news about the prison service and overcrowding over the weekend. I think I also heard about people not being sent to prison for some offences. I would truly believe that releasing the IPP prisoners, but providing plenty of support after release will go a long way to solving some of the prison problems.
Sincerely,
Greg Peters



Boden
PGA Press Release – President’s Opening Address – 10 October 2017
An extract from his speech ….
"The Government must be brave and reduce the prison population and don’t worry about votes. Don’t dabble, just do it because morally it is the right thing to do. 12 month sentences don’t work and are pointless. This cohort must be dealt with in a different way in the community. Executive Release is possible. We have prisoners on IPP sentences years past their tariff but still in prison. We have old and infirm who are no longer a danger to society and we have far too many mentally ill people where prison is absolutely the worst place for them."


Underwood Prisoners on this sentence lack support through out . It's as if people are sick of hearing about it and wana brush it under the carpet . Along with the unfortunate people -sex cases and nonces not included still serving this wretched sentence.  It doesn't surprise me in the slightest that this is still all on going . I got out two years ago after ten years in . On a twenty 5 month tariff too .
It's a joke !!!!


Piercy This sentence has no support network what so ever and it's about time someone did something about it...

Ford A deeper point is the way adults are infantalised at every step within the 'system', supposed to be taking responsibility for themselves but eg 'supervised (controlled), subject to the whim of people who take their wages and go home sometimes leaving desolation in their wake. Probation via the appalling Grayling is a punitive technique to prove to the gullible how well protected they are- I'm all for that not at the cost of crushing people by the exercise of petty power.

 Horton And if a prisoner actually dares to try to take some responsibility for themselves and their actions, and be honest instead of saying what the system Nazis want to hear they are frequently labelled as "difficult", or "still a risk".

Prisoners VoiceVictoria Derbyshire on IPP's. Ministry of Justice say they are working on the backlog but are refusing to comment on the original questions put to them. Every person in a position of power who work with prisoners, in one form or another, are saying IPP's should be given a release date.


Hibbert
46 minutes into this Nick Hardwick mentions that 75% off Ipp prisoners were either released or sent to cat D but can't give an exact figure on his findings. So ...how can he possibly give a percentage. He also forgets to mention how many are returned to closed conditions because they can't cope in a open prison. It looks good on paper but not in reality

Owen  Clear well written report telling it how it is ,thank you Boden. https://www.compen.crim.cam.ac.uk/Blog/blog-pages-full-versions/blog-13-keir


Friday, 13 October 2017

Investigation into the Parole Board,Justice Committee examine work of the Parole Board on IPP Prisoners who are asking the prisoners to help the situation.> And Ex-prisoners lack support, says probation head



12 October 2017
The Justice Committee will hold an evidence session on The work of the Parole Board on Wednesday 18 October 2017 at 10.00am in the Thatcher Room, Portcullis House.
Following up the National Audit Office’s February 2017 report Investigation into the Parole Board, the Committee will be asking about measures taken by the Parole Board and the Ministry of Justice to improve the effectiveness of the Board and the parole system which it administers.

The Committee will also be asking about the particular circumstances of people serving indeterminate sentences of imprisonment for public protection (IPP prisoners) who have served more than their tariff, and about steps which the Parole Board and the Ministry have taken, and could take in the future, to address their situation.

Witnesses

Wednesday 18 October 2017
At 10.00am: Professor Nick Hardwick, Chair, and Martin Jones, Chief Executive, Parole Board of England and Wales
At 10.45am (approx.): Sam Gyimah MP, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Prisons and Probation, Ministry of Justice.

Attend the meeting

Members of the public are welcome to attend the meeting.
There is no system of tickets or advance booking for seats in the public section of the committee room, but there is normally no problem in seating all members of the public who wish to attend.
Please advise security staff that you are attending a committee meeting and they will direct you.
You should allow at least 20 minutes to go through security.




Ex-prisoners lack support, says probation head

  • 13 October 2017
  •  
  • From the sectionUK
  •  
  • 55comments






A general view of a cell at HMP BerwynImage copyrightGETTY IMAGES

Too many prisoners leaving jail are merely being "signposted" towards rehabilitation services, the head of the Probation Service has admitted.
Michael Spurr said a new system of offender supervision in England and Wales "wasn't working" as it should.
Low and medium risk offenders are monitored by staff from 21 community rehabilitation companies (CRCs).
Managers involved say the system doesn't provide firms with enough incentives to tackle re-offending.
Mr Spurr addressed the issue at the annual conference of the Prison Governors Association near Derby, where one governor told him that 200 prisoners had been freed from the jail he runs with "next to nil" resettlement provision.
Mr Spurr responded: "CRCs are not working as we would have wanted them to work," adding that for many there was only a "basic resettlement service" available for offenders.
"Basic signposting is what's going on in a lot of places," he admitted.






Michael Spurr, the chief executive of the National Offender Management Service Agency
Image captionMichael Spurr: "CRCs are not working as we would have wanted them to work"

The system was introduced by Chris Grayling, when he was justice secretary, to reduce re-offending rates among the 270,000 people who are released from prison each year or serving community sentences. For the first time, inmates let out after serving terms of less than 12 months were also subject to monitoring.
A new state body, the National Probation Service (NPS), was set up to supervise offenders assessed as posing a high risk of harm, with CRCs responsible for the rest, from 2015.
Although the NPS is considered to be performing satisfactorily, there are huge difficulties at the CRCs.
In a highly critical speech last month, Dame Glenys Stacey, the Chief Inspector of Probation, said: "Although there are exceptions, the community rehabilitation companies... are not generally producing good quality work, not at all."
Dame Glenys said new ways of managing offenders had "largely stalled", there'd been little "meaningful" improvement in helping prisoners resettle on release and less involvement by charities and voluntary groups than expected.
"We often find nowhere near enough purposeful activity or targeted intervention or even plain, personal contact," she concluded.






Dame Glenys Stacey, HM Chief Inspector of ProbationImage copyrightHM CHIEF INSPECTOR OF PROBATION
Image captionDame Glenys Stacey has said that new methods of managing offenders have "largely stalled"

There appear to be three underlying causes.
First, the speed of the reforms. Mr Grayling wanted the plans to be embedded by the time of the 2015 general election to make it near-impossible for Labour to scrap them, should they be elected. That meant replacing 35 probation trusts with a part-privatised system within two years - without any pilot scheme.
Jacob Tas, chief executive of Nacro, a crime reduction charity which has a "strategic partnership" with the private firm Sodexo in six CRC areas, said that was a mistake, given the upheaval that had resulted.
"If you engage with this size of change, from my experience it's a good idea to test it out first and see and then learn and then make it better."






Chris GraylingImage copyrightPA
Image captionThe new supervision system was introduced by Chris Grayling, when he was justice secretary

The second reason concerns the CRCs' contracts. They're required to hit 24 performance targets relating, for example, to the timely completion of reports, but only 10% of their predicted payments depend on cutting re-offending.
"We're hitting our target but maybe missing the point," said Chris Wright, chief executive of Catch 22, a charity which is sub-contracted by three CRCs to work with offenders.
He said ministers had put an "industry of bureaucracy" in place to keep companies under control.
"In a classic government way, they think the best way of holding people to account is by building a bureaucracy which ultimately takes you away from doing the things that really matter," said Mr Wright.






HMP LiverpoolImage copyrightGETTY IMAGES
Image captionAbout 270,000 people are released from prison each year or are serving community sentences

It was a concern Mike Trace had when the charity he's in charge of, the Forward Trust, was bidding for CRC contracts.
"What became clear through the process is the innovation and the creativity to reduce re-offending was less important than the legal and financial risks or benefits," said Mr Trace. His organisation, then known as the Rehabilitation for Addicted Prisoners Trust (Rapt), withdrew from competing for contracts.
"I've got to say we were quite relieved not to be awarded any because they look to me to be misdirected and wrongly shaped," he said.
Thirdly, the way the payment mechanism for the CRCs was designed has left them with higher costs and lower income than they expected, leaving resources thinly stretched.
As a result, the government has adjusted the contracts, paying the CRCs extra money, which the Ministry of Justice said would amount to an additional £277m over seven years. Over a decade, the maximum potential value of the contracts is put at £6.5bn.
Michael Spurr said taxpayers would still end up paying less for probation than they did before the Grayling reforms, but after his acknowledgment of how "basic" the service is in many areas, some may question whether it's providing value for their money.



 

Comment



Boden Of the 3,683 IPP prisoners still in custody in December 2016, 84% (3,081) were beyond their tariff expiry date. Of these, 48% had been in prison five or more years beyond their tariff and
11% were eight years or more beyond their tariff. In July 2016, the Board announced its
intention to reduce the number of IPP prisoners in prison to 1,500 by s 2020?"
PP prisoners still in custody in December 2016, 84% (3,081) were beyond their tariff expiry date. Of these, 48% had been in prison five or more years beyond their tariff and 11% were eight years or more beyond their tariff. In July 2016, the Board announced its intention to reduce the number of IPP prisoners in prison to 1,500 by 2020." 
"As at September 2016 there were 3,859 IPP prisoners in the prison population.
The Board recorded that, of the 3,200 cases eligible for review, 2,336 were currently in the parole system at the Board. Of these, 679 (29%) were awaiting a listing; and 916 (39%) were not yet ready to list for an oral hearing, for example because the Board was awaiting the dossier from the National Offender Management Service (NOMS), awaiting others in the parole system to comply with its directions or awaiting witness availability before the case could be listed. The remaining 32% had already been heard or had been listed for a hearing.

"Delays mean that some prisoners may have spent longer in prison than they would have if their parole hearing had been held sooner. Prisoners who experience delays can claim compensation under the Human Rights Act once their case is concluded. Prisoners can claim at a rate of around £50 per month of delay if they are turned down for parole. If they are released following a delay, they can claim at a rate of around £650 per month. The Board makes these compensation payments from its own funds. In 2015-16, the Board received 463 private law damages claims, more than five times the 89 received in 2014-15. Since 2011-12, the Board has paid out £1.1 million in
compensation as a result of delays in hearings In 2015-16, prisoners were paid £554,000 in compensation for delayed hearings. 


This had increased from  £87,000 in 2012-13. As the Board attempts to reduce the backlog of outstanding cases, it will crystallise its liability for an increased number of potential compensation claims, and compensation costs may increase. In its 2015-16 accounts, the Board included a provision for £343,000 relating to known legal claims where these could be reliably estimated and which it expected it would have to pay out in the future."




http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-41595826
http://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/justice-committee/news-parliament-2017/evidence-session-work-of-the-parole-board/