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Thursday, 28 July 2016

IPP, s Prison Discrimination / defining whats a disability.tHE & human rights issues apart and parcel of IPP



"Havoc caused by a pre-occupation with the word risk.  The word risk is a  contradiction by the  government that let,s out  prisoner every single day."



Those with Dyslexia Dyspraxa Adhd Asperger's Autism or other are not getting the accommodation or support to go forward in the system moreover there are human rights violation and this needs to be challenged as they have been unable to go forward through the system no fault of there own. 
Lets first start by defining the term vulnerable of a person) in need of special care, support, or protection because of age, disability, or risk of abuse or neglect:
A person in need of special care, support or protection. For the purposes of this article we will be referring to those who have a Specific Learning Difficulty such as Dyslexia, Dyscalculia and those who have or suspected of having a Nuerodevelop mental Condition such as Asperger’s Autism.

Attending a  Hearings seeing  psychologist in Prison make heavy demands on language skills – both receptive and expressive – and require an ability to process information reasonably quickly and efficiently. Reliable memory, sequencing abilities and concentration are also necessary. All these areas fall within the profiles associated with Specific Learning Difficulties.
Vulnerable people also  include those who are young, those who have experienced trauma, those with autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit (hyperactivity) disorder ADHD, ADD, mental health needs, specific learning difficulties and deafness, as well as older people and those with physical disabilities or health conditions which may negatively affect their ability to effectively participate in the trial process.

Dyslexia identified as a disability as defined in the Equality Act 2010. Dyslexia and related Specific Learning Difficulties are the most common disability to be encountered in the Justice System. As ‘Hidden Disabilities’ they are the least understood and can give rise to significant disadvantages in  legal settings, even leading to miscarriages of justice.

 Dyslexia ADHD/ADD. Signs of Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder include inattention, restlessness, impulsivity, erratic, unpredictable and inappropriate behaviour, blurting out inappropriate comments or interrupting excessively. Some people come across unintentionally as aggressive. Most fail to make effective use of feedback. Behaviour is often misinterpreted and misunderstood. There are three main difficulties called the Triad of Impairments.

The impact of specific learning difficulties Prison  setting.
The following problem areas have been reported by people with Specific Learning Difficulties who have experience of court or tribunal proceedings:

  • A build up of stress, due to long delays at the hearing
  • Impossibility of following the cut and thrust of court exchanges
  • difficulty coping with oblique, implied and compound questions
  • difficulties giving accurate answers relating to dates, times or place name
  • problems providing consistent information on sequences of actions
  • inability to find the place in a mass of documentation, as directed
  • coping with a room full of strangers in unfamiliar settings
  • maintaining concentration and focus
  • an experience of sensory overload from the lights, bustle and distractions.

In addition, concerns were expressed about how their behaviour might be perceived: inconsistencies would imply untruthfulness; failure to grasp the point of a question could come across as evasive; lack of eye contact could be mis-interpreted as being ‘shifty’ and an over-loud voice might be regarded as aggressive. The overriding worry was that a loss of credibility would occur when they did not ‘perform’ as expected.



If you have a confirmed diagnosis or are suspected of having these conditions you need to make your legal team aware at the earliest stages and look a possibility  having a disability solicitor and barrister which you can have both for specialit cases such as IPP . You must inform all other partys but I have recorded this does not make that much differences due no training or lack of knowledge . Make sure the PAROLE HEARING is aware of your difficulties as this makes you vulnerable. But once again we have found they too lack knowledge  to understand the systems.of the neurological problems.

To be able to fully participate in proceedings the court must make reasonable adjustments for you.


Disabled prisoner victory 12 October 2009. Victory in prisoner disability discrimination case forces Prison Service rethink on disability issues 28 January 2008.https://www.leighday.co.uk/Asserting-your-rights/Human-rights/Prisoner-rights/Prisoners-and-discrimination

Recall washing machine
 
Hundreds  of IPP prisoners with these differences are faced with the plight of RECALL and of the vulnerable parents unable to pay the cost appeal since there is no legal aid .
Those with these types of differences have frequent difficulties with time keeping , misunderstanding ,getting the date and time wrong, turn up on wrong day get the tine wrong, missing appointments but continual being recalled for silly reasons. more leeway needs given for those with differences s AND training for all staff working with those who have nor-logical difficulties. Parole officers seem to work a system if your face fit or they like you I don't see a "fare system " in place that accommodates those who have neurological disability 25% leeway as a result of difficulties they have. yes im aware it a long processes   before you can be recalled but neurological differences  don't go away they are repetitive, has there been  fairness it clearly shows not. Often you may not be aware a person has a disability and my teachers in a sevay said they would not be able to recognise a person with a hidden disability and they work with children all day. 
 Recall  
  • Fairer system for all, one way does not work for all 
  • Recall to go before a judge. Magistrate who can independently weigh up facts before enacted(accept in the case of a further obvious offence.  
  • A licence can be challenged once in the community bearing in mind no legal aid for this now.
 People with a learning disability are individuals first and foremost and each has a right to be treated as an equal citizen…courts or prison must take all steps possible to ensure that people with a learning disability are able to actively participate in decisions affecting their lives.

Too narrow a focus the prisons accompanying failure to address his’ needs arising from their disability which might impact adversely on the length of sentence.
Prisons must also take steps to ensure there are no barriers to justice within the process itself. That staff must recognise those with learning disabilities need extra time with solicitors so that everything can be carefully explained to them…The process necessarily has to be slowed down to give such parents a better chance to understand and participate.

All parts of the Family justice system should take care as to the language and vocabulary that is utilised

The hearing judge or other should conduct a case management hearing to identify his difficulties and what reasonable adjustments he needs and who will assist him in parole. Failure to make reasonable adjust leading to a longer sentence. Failure to deal with his cognitive deficits and vulnerabilities. It has been widely know  those with disabilities spend double the time in prison and more and this practice must end. A solicitors  must be able to assist client but  often many solicitors are failing them or not advising correctly. solicitors to are expected to make reasonable adjustments to remove barriers for people with disabilities.

""""The basic principle is that if you come under the category of vulnerable when in prison you are entitled to a fair hearing. Article 6 of the human rights act is the right to a fair hearing. The right to a fair trial is fundamental to the rule of law and to democracy itself.""""

You are entitled to reasonable adjustments so that you are able to fully participate during the hearing.
You are entitled to a registered intermediary to assist you throughout the hearing. poor memory poor processing visual-spatial organization, receptive and expressive language, phonology, attention, Hearing impairmen auditory processing disorders known as brain deafness different from a hearing deafness, complex process—picking up sound and attaching meaning to it.


You have to have normal intelligence to have Dyslexia below is handicap so they are kept back from those who misunderstand as those with dyslexia can came across as been evasive and this in see written in the physiologist resorts staff and in hearing displaying they are not experienced enough or able to spot that its not being evasive there trying to recall this is p[art of the disability poor memory to recall in time  without looking as though your bee evasive.

Court hearings make heavy demands on language skills – both receptive and expressive – and require an ability to process information reasonably quickly and efficiently. Reliable memory, sequencing abilities and concentration are also necessary. All these areas fall within the profiles associated with Specific Learning Difficulties.

 impact of specific learning difficulties in a Probation setting or visiting a physiologist 


In addition, concerns were expressed about how their behaviour might be perceived: inconsistencies would imply untruthfulness; failure to grasp the point of a question could come across as evasive; lack of eye contact could be mis-interpreted as being ‘shifty’ and an over-loud voice might be regarded as aggressive. The overriding worry was that a loss of credibility would occur when they did not ‘perform’ as expected.


 Devastating  failings
It is a well documented  those with  disabilities spend double the time in prison than then there counter parts and you have to ask yourself why?  it is not an  excuse to say i have little or know  knowledge of a those disability when you are not qualified in making  reports that are effect others life,s and outcome. 
 First you must have understand  are they  discriminating but not having the want know what accommodations to give them and are failing them going forward. i have received hundreds of emails from family of those with and without differences  being held for 10... years denied  accommodation these examples needs a full investigation.
katherine Gleeson Founder of Dyslexia group increase awareness and understanding https://www.facebook.com/groups/bowde/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B2sXwd_J4e8
‘IPP is affecting mental health’
Emotionally and psychologically the IPP sentence is a form of torture. A study was once carried out on  one prisoner who had been held indefinitely without charge or trial at HMP Belmarsh’s infamous prison-within-a-prison, Upon Thames’ as it is known. The study found that it was the indeterminate nature of their incarceration which drove many insane, and some to take their own lives.Discrimination is part and parcel of IPP  the above.
.
IPP INQUEST
Senior Coroner raises concerns about the unmet mental health needs of prisoners serving IPP sentence,.and has asked the Prisons Minister to take action to prevent future deaths.Coroner Peter Dean heard the inquest into the death of Steven Trudgill, a 23 year old who died at HMP Highpoint. The inquest concluded on 24 May 2016, after two and a half weeks of evidence. Steven was found hanging in his cell by a prison officer...
 https://plus.google.com/+katherineGleeson/posts/7wxUTGRRLrq





"Quote".The Guardian
IPP sentences are not reserved for the most heinous of offences – they apply to people convicted of robbery, threats to kill and ABH as well as other more serious sexual and violent offences. The unique feature of the sentence is that it is not just imposed for what someone has done in the past but for what they might do in the future. The majority of those still stuck in the system are the “difficult” – angry, inarticulate, addicted or learning disabled who have not been able to navigate the path to their release. They are usually young men or at least were when they got their sentence. Many have lost hope. The majority are not what most people would regard as dangerous.

Unjust



Disabled prisoner victory 12 October 2009. Victory in prisoner disability discrimination case forces Prison Service rethink on disability issues 28 January 2008.https://www.leighday.co.uk/Asserting-your-rights/Human-rights/Prisoner-rights/Prisoners-and-discrimination


https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/Documents/Advice%20factsheets/Prisoners/p-discrimination-in-prison.pdf


Prisoners' Rights - Fisher Meredith Solicitors
www.fishermeredith.co.uk/site/personal/police-prison-law-solicitors/prisoner-rights/
Fisher Meredith s prison law solicitors can advise and represent prisoners in a range of areas. ... Cases linked to visiting rights; Disability (on grounds of race, disability or other ... The nature of your issue will determine the approach we take.http://www.fishermeredith.co.uk/site/personal/police-prison-law-solicitors/prisoner-rights/

Sinclairslaw: Specialist Legal help for everyone
http://www.scope.org.uk/Support/Disabled-people/local-advice/Legal-help
http://www.gov.scot/resource/doc/346993/0115487.pdf


Expert witness work | Dyslexia Assessment & Consultancy
www.workingwithdyslexia.com/legal-services/expert-witness-work/
Advise legal professionals on guidelines for accommodations which should be made for dyslexic people in court, as specified in the Judge's Equal Treatment ...


Protecting human rights
http://www.fishermeredith.co.uk/site/personal/police-prison-law-solicitors/human-rights-issues/


Information book for prisoners with a disability
Notice areas absent IPP AND DISABLITY ALONG WITH HUMANS RIGHTS YOU HAVE TO QUESTION ?
http://www.prisonreformtrust.org.uk/Publications/Publicationcategories/Learningdisabilities


"" Use  Disability solicitor in criminal law who understands the difficulties those face with Autism Dyslexia Dyspraxia  or other.

Tuesday, 26 July 2016

38 Degress IPP Petiton is being signed by one person Every Minute!

Dear Friends,
Exciting news – The  IPP  sentance and campaign was disused on BBC 5 Breakfast Radio with Nick Harwick , this went well. We have been mentioned in major newspaper this week! BBC News , London Evening Standard, Telegraph, Gov uk,  Ben blog discussed  IPP . There will be a up and coming Documentary in September IPP/Cuts.

Telegraph
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/07/26/prisoners-held-indefinitely-should-not-have-to-prove-they-are-sa/
London Evening Standard
http://www.standard.co.uk/news/crime/prisoners-should-not-have-to-prove-they-are-safe-to-release-says-parole-board-chief-a3304426.html.
Gove uk
Further a Press Release statement  From the parole board about the need to deal with the 4000 IPP prisoners.The content being old copy and paste and is  "Not so transparent and is  missing the point. https://www.gov.uk/government/news/statement-on-ipp-prisoners-from-parole-board-chairman

BBC News 

Here is what they said:
" quote".

Parole Board chief urges indefinite jail release change

Prisoners held indefinitely after serving their minimum term or tariff should not have to prove it is "safe" to release them, new Parole Board chairman Nick Hardwick has said.
Various factors make it "incredibly difficult" for some inmates on Imprisonment for Public Protection sentences to find such proof, he said.
He wants new criteria for freeing IPP prisoners in England and Wales.
The Ministry of Justice said the suggestion had been "taken on board".

But courts were banned from imposing any more IPP sentences in 2012 amid concerns they were being used to hold people for periods which their original offence did not warrant.
In March, 4,133 IPP prisoners continued to be detained, the majority of whom had been convicted of "violence against the person", sexual offences or robbery.

'Festering in prison'

The Parole Board can approve a prisoner's release after the minimum term - the "punishment" part of their sentence - but only if it is satisfied it is not necessary to hold the inmate in the interests of public protection.
It means the prisoner has to prove they do not present a risk and can be safely managed in the community.
In March, about 80% of IPP prisoners - 3,347 - had already served their minimum term but were still locked up.
In his first interview since taking up his post in March, Prof Hardwick told the BBC that procedural delays, problems accessing offending behaviour courses and finding suitable accommodation made it "incredibly difficult" for some IPP prisoners to prove that it was safe for them to be let out.
"Some of them are stuck, festering, in prison long after the punishment part of the sentence," he said.


Ministry of Justice figures show more than 500 IPP prisoners given tariffs of less than two years were still in prison five or more years later.
"Once it gets to that point, they stop making progress and they start going backwards," said Prof Hardwick.
"So this is, I think, a blot on the justice system and I'm very keen we can do something about it."

Risk test

He said Liz Truss, the new justice secretary, should consider activating Section 128 of the Legal Aid Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012.
The clause allows the justice secretary to alter the test which the Parole Board has to apply when releasing prisoners.
Both houses of Parliament would have to agree to the change, but fresh legislation would not be required.
"There are legislative options that will enable us to change the risk test so it's more about 'is there proof that they're dangerous rather than proof that they're safe?' and there are some other measures that can be taken... to try to cut into that group," Prof Hardwick said.
The former Chief Inspector of Prisons said there were three categories of IPP inmate who would benefit most: Those on very short tariffs but still in custody; prisoners held beyond the maximum sentence for the offence they had committed; and offenders who were too frail or elderly to pose a danger.

'Crazy'

The Parole Board is also trying to cut the backlog of prisoners awaiting decisions on their release, by hiring more parole panel members and dealing with cases more efficiently.
Prof Hardwick said it was "crazy" to be paying out compensation to inmates held in custody because their cases were delayed due to a lack of resources.
In 2015-16, there were 463 damages claims lodged, five times the number the previous year, with £554,000 paid out in compensation, compared to £144,000 the year before.
"It's not a good use of taxpayers' money," Prof Hardwick said.
"It would be much better to put the money into ensuring that the system is working efficiently so that people get dealt with fairly and get out when they're supposed to and when the courts intended."
The Ministry of Justice said: "The chair of the Parole Board has made a number of recommendations to improve the parole system and reduce the backlog of IPP prisoners.
"Work is ongoing within the department to address these issues and his recommendations have been taken on board".

Bens blog
http://prisonerben.blogspot.co.uk/2016_07_01_archive.html?m=1

Sign the Petition
http://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/free-the-remaining-ipp-prisoners

Monday, 25 July 2016

IPP FAMILY EXCLUSIVE

  Nick Hardwick wait  for the morning BBC 5 breakfast  subject,  I will?

 

Excusive , Nick Hardward and bbc 5 breakfast time

Excusive , time 00,37  27 07 2016 Nick Hardward and bbc 5 breakfast time 

Monday, 18 July 2016

IPP FAMILEYS AND PRISONERS HAVE PULLED TOGETHER TO LOG EVIDENCE OF ABUSE OF MPs NOT RETURING CALLS LETTERS FORM THOUSTANDS OF FAMILYS, THAT HAS LED TO THE DEATHS OF IPP,S

 

 
Danny Weatherston 'trapped' 10 years into a 13 month jail sentence Danny had to serve 13 months before applying for parole - but under an Imprisonment for Public Protection sentence he is still in jail a decade later
Danny Weatherson
behind bars for more than nine years, frustrated Danny Weatherson has attempted to kill himself as he continues to fight for his release.
Danny was just 18 when a judge recommended he served almost 16 months for two attempted robberies before he could apply for parole - but almost a decade on, he still has no release date.
ADVERTISING
 
His time inside has been in high security prisons including HMP Northumberland, HMP Moorlands in Doncaster, HMP Armley in Leeds, HMP Frankland in Durham and is now in HMP Hull. And he has taken to self-harm to get him through his days.
But his family says in February the Parole Board said Danny could be moved to a category D open prison.
However, just weeks later, he was told the prison that had been chosen was changed and Danny slit his throat as his hopes were shattered.
His solicitor, Shirley Noble, says he is being kept inside as he “poses a risk to himself” and uses the self-harming mechanism to release the pain he suffers emotionally.
He is now being kept in a hospital wing were he can be continually monitored.
Now Danny’s dad, Maurice Stevens, is hitting out at the system after his son was locked up under the controversial Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentence which came into force for England and Wales in 2005 but was axed in 2012.
It was intended to protect the public against criminals whose crimes were not serious enough to merit a normal life sentence but who were regarded as too dangerous to be released when the term of their original sentence had expired.
Ministry of Justice data shows the number of IPP prisoners still being held since the sentences was abolished has reduced over the past year - from 4,756 on March 31 2015 to 4,133 on March 31 2016.
Danny Weatherson
The authorities admits the IPP sentence was widely criticised and “used far more widely than intended”. And this is why it was replaced with a new regime of tough, determinate sentences, alongside life sentences for the most serious offenders.
Maurice, 44, of Lemington, Newcastle, says he has seen Danny’s mood deteriorate. “He has nothing to live for,” said Maurice, a builder, who will next visit him on July 18 when he celebrates his 28th birthday.
“He cut his throat with a razor about seven or eight times, I don’t know what he will do next.”
Justice secretary Michael Gove has ordered a review of the position of thousands of prisoners serving an IPP sentence. Many are considered to be languishing inside because they are several years over the minimum sentence they were given.
Danny, of Scotswood, Newcastle, who had been in trouble for a string on minor crimes before being jailed, is among those who feels they have been left to rot behind bars.
Dad-of-two Maurice added: “He has been knocked back about five times by the Parole Board but in February they all said he would be eligible for a category D open prison. But a week or two later inside probation said he wasn’t suitable. She had only met him twice and she doesn’t know him to make a decision like this.
“In late March he slit his throat with a razor blade, he’s got the scars. You can tell he is hurting inside. These IPP sentences mean he has no target date to get out and he is going year after year and getting nowhere. He is sick of his life, you can tell in his eyes he has nothing to live for.
“There are thousands of people stuck in the system on these IPPs and they are languishing in jail. The probation and the parole boards don’t know what to do with them. They were abolished in 2012 but still Danny and so many others are stuck in prison.”
Mr Gove has asked chairman of the parole board Nick Hardwick to review how IPP prisoners are treated.
While the justice secretary has said that dangerous offenders must be kept inside, he says he wants the majority of IPP prisoners to be “given hope and a reason to engage in rehabilitative activity”. He wants to see the prison population reduced.
Maurice StevensMaurice Stevens
Danny’s solicitor Shirley Noble, of Northumberland based Alderson Law Solicitors, said: “In summary, it is fair to say that Danny had a minimum term of one year, three months and 26 days imposed upon him on February 16, 2007, and his tariff expired on the April 13, 2008.
“Danny has progressed well during his sentence although he has had the odd ‘blip’, some of which is understandable in what is an artificial environment. He has completed all of the core risk reduction work which has been recommended for him as part of his sentence plan and has demonstrated that he has good interpersonal skills. In fact Danny could be described as an articulate, intelligent man.
“I personally believe that as a result of the time he has been incarcerated along with the frustration of not having an end date to his sentence, he has lost his identity. He appeared before the Parole Board in February 2016 when the panel recommended a progressive move to open conditions. This obviously gave Danny some hope that there was light at the end of the tunnel. However due to an adverse development which was subsequently resolved the prison made contact with the Public Protection Casework Section (PPCS) to revoke the recommendation. He self-harmed severely as a means of coping with the disappointment. The prison now say he should not progress to open, he is still a risk, however he is a risk of harm to himself as opposed to the public. This is a method he uses to deal with stress and anxiety and a belief he is being let down. Keeping him incarcerated will only exacerbate this and in the meantime he becomes more institutionalised, treading water so to speak and trying to be normal in an abnormal environment with no light at the end of the tunnel. A prison environment is unlikely to be able to manage the self-harm issues effectively, whilst he does have constructive positive engagement with mental health but the prison is there to help him rehabilitate, which he has strived to do.
A Ministry of Justice spokesperson said: “The number of IPP prisoners has reduced over the past year.
“However, we recognise there are problems in the system, so the justice secretary has asked the chairman of the Parole Board to develop an improved approach to the parole system for these offenders.
“We continue to prioritise IPP prisoners for places on courses and provide other interventions to help them reduce their risk and progress towards release.”

Monday, 11 July 2016

IPP INQUEST Senior Coroner raises concerns about the unmet mental health needs of prisoners serving IPP sentence,.and has asked the Prisons Minister to take action to prevent future deaths.





HM Senior Coroner Peter Dean heard the inquest into the death of Steven Trudgill, a 23 year old who died at HMP Highpoint. The inquest concluded on 24 May 2016, after two and a half weeks of evidence. Steven was found hanging in his cell by a prison officer on 9 January 2014 and died shortly after. The jury conclusion was suicide.
 HMC Peter Dean has now issued a Prevention of Future Death report to the Prisons Minister expressing his concerns about the mental health needs of prisoners serving IPP sentences.
Steven was a vulnerable young person, with longstanding mental health problems. He was remanded into custody when he was 18 and subsequently transferred 4 times to different prisons. He began to self harm whilst in custody and had been subject to prison suicide and self-harm preventions procedures on numerous occasions throughout his detention, including at HMP Highpoint where he was transferred in December 2013, shortly before his death.

The inquest heard that Steven was ‘stuck’ in the system. He was serving an IPP, and was several years past the minimum term which had been set by the sentencing judge. As with all indeterminate sentenced prisoners, Steven could only be released by the Parole Board. However whilst in prison, Steven was finding it extremely difficult to progress. The family heard evidence at the inquest that the mental health support Steven  received was inadequate: Steven had a history of self harm, he was being prescribed medication without any clear diagnosis or treatment plan, and had been seriously destabilised by the unexpected closure of HMP Blundeston and his transfer between two successive prisons immediately before Christmas 2013. He was very anxious about his forthcoming Parole Board review which had been delayed.

 At HMP Highpoint Steven spoke to staff about his thoughts of suicide, including one lengthy conversation two days before his death, but there were problems in passing key information about risks between prison staff.
The Coroner has warned the Prison’s Minister that action needs to be taken to reduce the risk of other IPP prisoners dying in similar circumstances in the future.  He has reported his concern that there are other vulnerable prisoners still on IPP’s, who are at significant risk of continuing self harm due to the prison system being inadequate to meet their needs. 

He noted the infrequent nature of Parole Board hearings, occurring only every two or three years, as the only means of assessing whether the prisoner should be released, as well as the lack of availability of specific treatments for complex mental health needs which may be the cause of continued risk resulting in extended detention. The Coroner has called on the Prisons Minister to consider assessing all prisoners currently still within the prison service on IPP’s to see if they have mental health needs more appropriately managed with the mental health service rather than the prison service.

The Prison’s Minister is due to respond in August, at which point the report and the response will be published.
IPP sentences were abolished by the Legal Aid Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act in 2013 following widespread concern that they had been misused by over-cautious judges and there were now thousands of prisoners stuck in the system without release date, or the means by which they could demonstrate their readiness for release.
 People serving an IPP have one of the highest rates of self-harm in the prison system.  For every 1,000 people serving an IPP there were 550 incidents of self-harm. This compares with 324 incidents for people serving a determinate sentence, and is more than twice the rate for people serving life sentences.

Steven’s mother Jennie Buckle said:
“Steven’s family are disappointed that after 3 weeks of evidence the jury took just 1½ hours to come to a conclusion.  We are shocked and saddened that despite evidence given under oath showing that mistakes were made, the jury chose to ignore this. 

We take comfort that since Steven’s sad death a number of new practices have been implemented at HMP Highpoint to help prevent future deaths.
We are also glad that the Senior Coroner for Suffolk, Dr Peter Dean, has recognised that despite IPP sentences being abolished there are still prisoners on IPP sentences serving time above their tariff that could be vulnerable to mental health issues. 

 We are very pleased with the Prevention of Future Death Report that he has written to the Prisons Minister requesting changes be made to the current system that failed Steven.  The aim of this proposal would be to ensure that the appropriate level and form of mental healthcare can be provided to prisoners serving IPP sentences  in the most suitable environment in order to manage their underlying condition and reduce the risk of suicide, reduce future risk to the public and provide care that might enable them to be more safely released in future, while still providing current public protection by virtue of the security of the unit.
We hope and pray that the new practices are followed and don’t just become a “tick box exercise”.  
The only way to help prevent future deaths is to make real changes and give people the help and care needed.”
Deborah Coles, Executive Director of INQUEST said:
“INQUEST welcomes the report of the Senior Coroner for Suffolk Dr Peter Dean. The statistics for self harm of prisoners serving IPP sentences are truly shocking and while it was a positive step that such sentences were abolished, changes must be made urgently to ensure the safety and protection of those still serving IPP sentences within the prison system.”
INQUEST has been working with the family of Steven Trudgill since 2014. The family is represented by INQUEST Lawyers Group member Sara Lomri from Bindmans solicitors and Jesse Nicholls from Doughty Street Chambers.http://www.inquest.org.uk/media/pr/senior-coroner-raises-concerns-about-the-unmet-mental-health-needs-of-priso



Katherine Gleeson
Mental Health  /Discrimination 

Those with Dyslexia or other are not getting the accommodation or support to go forward in the system moreover i feel this is a human rights violation.

Lets first start by defining the term vulnerable of a person) in need of special care, support, or protection because of age, disability, or risk of abuse or neglect:
A person in need of special care, support or protection. For the purposes of this article we will be referring to those who have a Specific Learning Difficulty such as Dyslexia, Dyscalculia and those who have or suspected of having a Nuerodevelopmental Condition such as Asperger’s Autism.

Prison hearings make heavy demands on language skills – both receptive and expressive – and require an ability to process information reasonably quickly and efficiently. Reliable memory, sequencing abilities and concentration are also necessary. All these areas fall within the profiles associated with Specific Learning Difficulties
 ADHD ADD. Vulnerable people include those who are young, those who have experienced trauma, those with autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit (hyperactivity) disorder ADHD, ADD, mental health needs, specific learning difficulties and deafness, as well as older people and those with physical disabilities or health conditions which may negatively affect their ability to effectively participate in the trial process.

Dyslexia is identified as a disability as defined in the Equality Act 2010. Dyslexia and related Specific Learning Difficulties are the most common disability to be encountered in the Justice System. As ‘Hidden Disabilities’ they are the least understood and can give rise to significant disadvantages in police and legal settings, even leading to miscarriages of justice.

 Dyslexia ADHD/ADD. Signs of Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder include inattention, restlessness, impulsivity, erratic, unpredictable and inappropriate behaviour, blurting out inappropriate comments or interrupting excessively. Some people come across unintentionally as aggressive. Most fail to make effective use of feedback. Behaviour is often misinterpreted and misunderstood.There are three main difficulties called the Triad of Impairments.


The impact of specific learning difficulties Prison  setting

The following problem areas have been reported by people with Specific Learning Difficulties who have experience of court or tribunal proceedings:

a build up of stress, due to long delays at the hearing
impossibility of following the cut and thrust of court exchanges
difficulty coping with oblique, implied and compound questions
difficulties giving accurate answers relating to dates, times or place names
problems providing consistent information on sequences of actions
inability to find the place in a mass of documentation, as directed
coping with a room full of strangers in unfamiliar settings
maintaining concentration and focus
an experience of sensory overload from the lights, bustle and distractions.

In addition, concerns were expressed about how their behaviour might be perceived: inconsistencies would imply untruthfulness; failure to grasp the point of a question could come across as evasive; lack of eye contact could be mis-interpreted as being ‘shifty’ and an over-loud voice might be regarded as aggressive. The overriding worry was that a loss of credibility would occur when they did not ‘perform’ as expected.


If you have a confirmed diagnosis or are suspected of having these conditions you need to make your legal team aware at the earliest stages. They must inform the other parties. The PAROLE HEARING must be made aware of your difficulties as this makes you vulnerable. To be able to fully participate in proceedings the court must make reasonable adjustments for you.


Disabled prisoner victory 12 October 2009. Victory in prisoner disability discrimination case forces Prison Service rethink on disability issues 28 January 2008.https://www.leighday.co.uk/Asserting-your-rights/Human-rights/Prisoner-rights/Prisoners-and-discrimination

Recall washing machine
 
HUNDREDS of IPP prisoners with differences are faced with the plight of RECALL and of the vulnerable parents unable to pay the cost appeal since there is no legal aid . Those with these types of differences have frequent difficulties with time keeping , misunderstanding ,getting the date and time wrong, turn up on wrong day get the tine wrong, missing appointments but continual being recalled for silly reasons. more leeway needs given for those with differences s AND training for all staff working with those who have nor-logical difficulties

People with a learning disability are individuals first and foremost and each has a right to be treated as an equal citizen…courts or prison must take all steps possible to ensure that people with a learning disability are able to actively participate in decisions affecting their lives.

Too narrow a focus the prisons accompanying failure to address his’ needs arising from their disability which might impact adversely on the length of sentence.
Prisons must also take steps to ensure there are no barriers to justice within the process itself. That staff must recognise those with learning disabilities need extra time with solicitors so that everything can be carefully explained to them…The process necessarily has to be slowed down to give such parents a better chance to understand and participate.

All parts of the Family justice system should take care as to the language and vocabulary that is utilised

The hearing judge or other should conduct a case management hearing to identify his difficulties and what reasonable adjustments he needs and who will assist him in parole.
i could possible look at disblity solicitor and go down the road of failure to make reasonable adjust leading to a longer sentence.failure by to deal with his cognitive deficits and vulnerabilities. It has been widly know if you by agency those with disablitys spend double the time this practice must end.A solicitors r must be able to assist client and often many solicitors are failing them or not advising them of who they could seek. solicitors to are expected to make reasonable adjustments to remove barriers for people with disabilities.

""""The basic principle is that if you come under the category of vulnerable when in prison you are entitled to a fair hearing. Article 6 of the human rights act is the right to a fair hearing. The right to a fair trial is fundamental to the rule of law and to democracy itself.""""

You are entitled to reasonable adjustments so that you are able to fully participate during the hearing.
You are entitled to a registered intermediary to assist you throughout the hearing. poor memory poor prosseing visual-spatial organization, receptive and expressive language, phonology, attention, Hearing impairmen auditory processing disorders known as brain deafness different from a hearing deafness,complex process—picking up sound and attaching meaning to it. You have to have normal intelligence to have Dyslexia below is handycape so they are kept back from those who misunderstand as those with dyslexia can came across as been evasive and this in see written in the physiologist resorts staff and in hearing displaying they are not experienced enough or able to spot that its not being evasive there trying to recall this is p[art of the disablity poor memory to recall and in time without looging as though your bee evasive. i Know i too have dyslexia dyspraxia with overlaps i also founder of one of the biggest dyslexia groups in the UK on Facebook called Dyslexia increase awareness and understanding.


Court hearings make heavy demands on language skills – both receptive and expressive – and require an ability to process information reasonably quickly and efficiently. Reliable memory, sequencing abilities and concentration are also necessary. All these areas fall within the profiles associated with Specific Learning Difficulties.

 impact of specific learning difficulties in a Probation setting or visiting a physiologist

The following problem areas have been reported by people with Specific Learning Difficulties who have experience of court or tribunal proceedings:

a build up of stress, due to long delays at the hearing
impossibility of following the cut and thrust of court exchanges
difficulty coping with oblique, implied and compound questions
difficulties giving accurate answers relating to dates, times or place names
problems providing consistent information on sequences of actions
inability to find the place in a mass of documentation, as directed
coping with a room full of strangers in unfamiliar settings
maintaining concentration and focus
an experience of sensory overload from the lights, bustle and distractions.

In addition, concerns were expressed about how their behaviour might be perceived: inconsistencies would imply untruthfulness; failure to grasp the point of a question could come across as evasive; lack of eye contact could be mis-interpreted as being ‘shifty’ and an over-loud voice might be regarded as aggressive. The overriding worry was that a loss of credibility would occur when they did not ‘perform’ as expected.
 Devastating  failings
.It is a well documented  those with  disabilitys spend double the time in prison than then there counter parts and you have to ask yourself why?  it is not an  excuse to say i have little or know  knowledge of a those disability when you are not qualified in making  reports that are effect others life,s and outcome. 
 First you must have understand  are they  discriminating but not having the want know what accommodations to give them and are failing them going forward. i have received hundreds of emails from family of those with dyslexa or other held for numbers of years denied  accommodation their are  which needs a full investigation.  Founder katherine Gleeson of Dyslexia group increase awareness and understanding gleesohttps://www.facebook.com/groups/bowde/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B2sXwd_J4e8

Disabled prisoner victory 12 October 2009. Victory in prisoner disability discrimination case forces Prison Service rethink on disability issues 28 January 2008.https://www.leighday.co.uk/Asserting-your-rights/Human-rights/Prisoner-rights/Prisoners-and-discrimination


https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/Documents/Advice%20factsheets/Prisoners/p-discrimination-in-prison.pdf


Prisoners' Rights - Fisher Meredith Solicitors
www.fishermeredith.co.uk/site/personal/police-prison-law-solicitors/prisoner-rights/
Fisher Meredith s prison law solicitors can advise and represent prisoners in a range of areas. ... Cases linked to visiting rights; Disability (on grounds of race, disability or other ... The nature of your issue will determine the approach we take.http://www.fishermeredith.co.uk/site/personal/police-prison-law-solicitors/prisoner-rights/

Sinclairslaw: Specialist Legal help for everyone
http://www.scope.org.uk/Support/Disabled-people/local-advice/Legal-help
http://www.gov.scot/resource/doc/346993/0115487.pdf


Expert witness work | Dyslexia Assessment & Consultancy
www.workingwithdyslexia.com/legal-services/expert-witness-work/
Advise legal professionals on guidelines for accommodations which should be made for dyslexic people in court, as specified in the Judge's Equal Treatment ...


Protecting human rights
http://www.fishermeredith.co.uk/site/personal/police-prison-law-solicitors/human-rights-issues/


Information book for prisoners with a disability
Notice areas absent IPP AND DISABLITY ALONG WITH HUMANS RIGHTS YOU HAVE TO QUESTION ?
http://www.prisonreformtrust.org.uk/Publications/Publicationcategories/Learningdisabilities


"" Use  Disability solicitor in criminal law who understands the difficulties those face with Autism Dyslexia Dyspraxia  or other.